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Aug 6, 2022
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The West lost the second battle of El Alamein

In Egypt, Rosatom announced the start of construction there by Rosatom of one of the world’s largest nuclear power plants

In July – August. The 80th anniversary of the “great battle” near El Alamein in Egypt, in which the Western allies call the victory over the German army of Rommel, is perhaps the main event of the Second World War, not only in Africa, but in general. Regardless of the adequacy of such historical assessments, something went wrong with the Anglo-Saxons today in these places. This was felt during the recent tour of Africa, including Egypt, Ethiopia, Uganda and the Republic of the Congo, by Russian Foreign Minister S. Lavrov.

In the West, especially in the United States, they are extremely dissatisfied with the position taken by a significant number of African countries on the situation around Ukraine and the imposition of anti-Russian sanctions. They refuse to condemn or join the blockade against Russia, and they refuse to vote for resolutions pushed by Washington against Moscow in various international forums. But these are 54 countries and 1 billion 400 million people, which are undermined by the Western narrative about the “unanimous condemnation” of Russian actions by the world community.

Rommel and commander of the 21st Wehrmacht Panzer Division Georg von Bismarck in El Alamein

Rommel and commander of the 21st Wehrmacht Panzer Division Georg von Bismarck in El Alamein

Lavrov in Egypt

Lavrov in Egypt

Western politicians are inclined to consider such a line of the Africans as a consequence of their own minor flaws or “Kremlin intrigues”. They do not see in it Africa’s traditional distrust of former colonialists, coupled with the inability of the former mother countries to offer Africans anything worthwhile in vital areas from the economy to the security sphere. Mere pressure and blackmail from the old days in Africa can no longer achieve much. China has long been its main economic partner, which has a positive effect on the policy of the countries of the continent towards Moscow. The latter proved to be fundamentally reliable in supporting the stability of the countries of the continent. Guided not by the Western principle of “divide and conquer”, but by its own (“African problems – an African solution,” as Lavrov formulated), Moscow has managed to gain impressive prestige in Africa. And Russia is pursuing this principle not at a loss, but on a mutually beneficial economic basis. In addition, it can offer the states of the region something that even China cannot deliver to them. In addition to military-technical cooperation and growing food sales, the production of which in the West is getting worse, these are global high-tech projects of global significance.

Some of them were named during the African tour of S. Lavrov. For example, Gazprom’s willingness, unexpected for many, to build two gigantic gas pipelines from hydrocarbon-rich Nigeria to Europe was confirmed. The first one, with a total length of 5,660 kilometers and an estimated cost of $25-30 billion, should pass through 13 countries along the Atlantic coast in Morocco. The second one with a close laying price is through Algeria. No one in the world, except us, has neither the experience nor the competence to implement such projects.

Trans-African gas pipeline projects

Trans-African gas pipeline projects

Europe no longer wants to buy Russian gas, so please, let it buy African. Russia will still receive its share of the profit from its sale under this project, and will send its own raw materials to where it will not be put forward political claims. But this is a matter of perspective.

And now in Egypt, Rosatom has announced the start of construction there by Rosatom of one of the largest in the world and the most advanced in terms of efficiency, as well as the security of a nuclear power plant of four units of the VVER type with a capacity of 1200 gigawatts. Its annual output can reach 40 billion kWh (almost five times more than at the famous Aswan hydroelectric power station), and the construction cost is $25 billion. It will be built in the town of El Dabaa in close proximity to the legendary El Alamein.

It is assumed that high-tech industries will be created here on the basis of cheap electricity, as well as a Mediterranean tourist megazone, which in terms of its importance for the Egyptian economy will surpass its famous Red Sea resorts.

Location of the El Dabaa nuclear power plant

Location of the El Dabaa nuclear power plant

Thus, in the new battle of El Alamein, it is not the guns that win, but the peaceful atom. Given the importance of this object for the whole life of Egypt, it is easy to imagine where this country, which has not yet completely got rid of American fetters, will look first of all in the future. Cairo has already unequivocally announced its intentions to join both the BRICS and the SCO, and Moscow just as definitely considers it the first candidate from Africa to take the seat of a permanent member of the UN Security Council in the event of its reform. Washington made no such promises to Egypt.

French President E. Macron in Africa

French President E. Macron in Africa

In general, the West is somehow more and more falling out of the “chariot of time”. Concerned about the loss of influence in Africa, he takes steps that are more strange than intelligible. In parallel with Lavrov, French President E. Macron visited a number of African countries. His tour included Cameroon, Benin and Guinea-Bissau. Bringing nothing concrete with him, he reduced contacts with African leaders to arrogant moralizing and inappropriate calls to take the “right position” towards Russia. French publicist and African specialist Antoine Glaser called Paris’ view of the continent “historical anachronism”. France continues to treat Africa with a post-colonial blindness, imagining that it still wields exceptional influence on the continent. “However, as the expert notes, the times when Paris could dictate its will to African leaders are gone forever, including due to military interventions in the affairs of the continent in recent years.” At a joint press conference with Cameroonian President Paul Biya, Macron managed to to insult a number of African countries with chokh, saying that Russia’s cooperation with them “is more like complicity with weakened political authorities or absolutely illegitimate military juntas.”

In this audience, Macron still enjoys attention

In this audience, Macron still enjoys attention

Swiss TV channel SRF notes that what helps Russia most of all is that it has never had colonies in Africa itself. Africans are still grateful to the Soviet Union for financial and military support in their liberation struggle. “Even three-quarters of a century after the fall of European empires, the memory of their colonial rule can still be used to earn political capital, and Moscow does it very cleverly.”

After the failure of Macron, in order to rehabilitate the consequences of the defeat in the “second battle of El Alamein” and agitation against Russia, a more “heavy tank” is going to go on a multi-day tour of Africa – US Secretary of State E. Blinken. But if he intends to speak to local leaders in the same haughty way, and this gentleman cannot be changed, the result is likely to be the same disappointing.

E. Blinken with US Ambassador to the UN Linda Thomas-Greenfield at a meeting with ministers of African countries in New York:

E. Blinken with US Ambassador to the UN Linda Thomas-Greenfield at a meeting with ministers of African countries in New York: “How dare you!”

By the way, another character has gathered in Africa with similar goals – the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine D. Kuleba. Indeed, where Blinken with a hoof goes, Kuleba with a claw goes there!

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