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Dec 28, 2020
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Test: serious research or joke?

Some of the statements below are supported by quite serious scientific works. The other part is the data of parody research, which is published annually by the influential magazine The BMJ in Christmas issues.

These “frivolous” studies are fully peer-reviewed and are usually based on real data. However, there are nuances in using this data and applying scientific methods. For example, in 2013, scientists used all the tools of science to calculate how much alcohol James Bond drank, and in 2012 – to find out why Rudolph (Santa’s reindeer) has a red nose.

The media and readers often take The BMJ’s Christmas themes at face value. At the same time, data from serious research can sometimes be puzzling. We invite you to distinguish fully serious scientific data from incompletely serious ones.

Test results links:

  1. This is data from the 2020 BMJ Christmas issue.
  2. This information was published by the American Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2009. The agency points out that cats are safer animals in terms of the risk of falls.
  3. This data is from the 2019 BMJ Christmas issue.
  4. This is data from the 2020 BMJ Christmas issue.
  5. This was the conclusion of a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Interventional cardiologists perform minimally invasive interventions in patients with acute heart attacks, such as placing stents in the coronary artery. Patients with myocardial infarction without ST-segment elevation on an ECG (this is a less severe form of it) survived better when these specialists were at the conference and were absent from the hospital.
  6. This data is from the 2017 BMJ Christmas issue.
  7. Scientists received such data in 2018. They point to their paradoxical nature and the need for clarification. This study was comparatively large, with 844 participants.
  8. This data is from the 2019 BMJ Christmas issue.
  9. These are the conclusions of a study conducted by Canadian scientists.
  10. This is data from the 2020 BMJ Christmas issue.


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